A copyright owner has five rights to his or her copyrighted work:

Reproduction Right—The reproduction right is the right to copy, duplicate, transcribe, or imitate the work in fixed form.

Modification Right—The modification right (also known as the derivative works right) is the right to modify the work to create a new work. A new work that is based on preexisting work is known as a `derivative work.`

Distribution Right—The distribution right is the right to distribute copies of the work to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending.

Public Performance Right—The public performance right is the right to recite, play, dance, act, or show the work at public place or to transmit it to the public. In the case of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, showing the work`s images out of sequence is considered `performance.` Sound recordings—recorded versions of music or other sounds—do not have a public performance right.

Public Display Right—The public display right is the right to show a copy of the work directly or by means of film, slide, or television image at a public place or to transmit it to the public. In the case of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, showing the work`s images out of sequence is considered `display.`